Member Login
Member Login

Exposed Aggregate in a GFRC Concrete Countertop

I’ve heard people say that they don’t like GFRC because it looks too uniform, like plastic solid surface. Nonsense! GFRC can have any look any other form of concrete can. It is concrete, after all.

Here’s a great example. In summer 2011, I spent 3 months in the Cayman Islands helping my student Terry. We did a gazebo bartop using a cast in place technique and a mix delivered in a truck from the local batch plant.

man placing rebar in gazebo before casting concrete countertop

Forming for the cast in place gazebo

Mix being delivered from batch plant

closeup of corner of tan concrete countertop with small decorative stone aggregate

The finished look

We also did round and rectangular tables for a restaurant, and the owner wanted exactly the same look as the gazebo, plus some amber glass. But, the tables couldn’t be cast in place, and they couldn’t be too heavy.

No problem! With GFRC, I was able to create a face coat (like a mist coat, but with aggregate in it and obviously not sprayed) that exactly duplicated the look of the cast in place mix. Then I just applied a backer coat to that. The result: Just the right look and a happy client. GFRC made it possible.

Lots of buckets! This is the “batch plant” for GFRC.

The round tables, showing backer coat

The finished look

Comments are closed.

Instant Free Access:

You will learn:

The biggest mistake almost everyone in the industry is making that compromises strength and risks failure.

A cost-conscious, from-scratch mix design that really works

Exactly which tools and materials you really need, all non-proprietary and at the best prices.

How to make DIY concrete countertop free seminar

Instant Free Access:

You will learn:

A simple, from-scratch mix design that really works!

How to template, form, mix, cast, cure, polish, seal, install.

Exactly what equipment you need – and don’t need